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5 Days to Make Your Blog More Valuable: Day 4

Posted in Blogging

Make your blog post interesting and worth reading. That is the subject for Day 4 in our series 5 Days to Make Your Blog More Valuable.

I recently wrote: Why is Your Blog Not Attracting Clients? I suggested that you do more than simply report about a new case, new law or new regulation. Your clients and potential clients may value you informing them about a recent development, but they are far more interested in your thoughts on how the recent development may impact them.

I urge lawyers I coach to add a sub-heading: Takeaways. Mike Schmidt, a Cozen O’Connor partner I coached writes: Social Media Employment Law Blog. In each post, he concludes with Employer Takeaways. I like Mike’s approach.

Cleve Clinton and Jamie Ribman, two Looper, Reed & McGraw partners I coached write a humorous blog: Tilting the Scales. I enjoy reading it because they tell real legal stories with made up humorous names for the characters. Even though their blog is humorous, at the end of each post they have a subheading: Tilting the Scales in Your Favor.

You don’t have to do it for every post, but certainly do it when the takeaway would be valuable for your readers. Charlie Sartain, another Looper, Reed & McGraw partner I coach writes the Energy & the Law blog. When Charlie believes the takeaways are important, he will have that subheading. See, as an example, his post: The Prospect Generator’s Case, a Second Look.

Jay O’Keeffe is a Gentry, Locke, Rakes & Moore lawyer I coached writes: DeNovo: A Virginia Appellate Law Blog. Jay takes another approach to make his blog more interesting. He uses analogies. (If you forgot from grade school English class what these terms mean, read Metaphor, Simile and Analogy: What’s the Difference?)

In a recent post titled: Behind the Scenes at the Fourth Circuit: How the Court Decides Whether to Award Oral Argument, Jay compared the chances of getting an oral argument before the Fourth Circuit to the chances of getting into an Ivy League college.

As you can see, there are a variety of ways you can make your blog more interesting, and thus more valuable, to your readers. Try one.