Cordell Parvin Blog Developing the Next Generation of Rainmakers

Old vs. New Style Marketing

Posted in Client Development

I recently wrote: My Best Tip: How to attract new clients. It focused on lawyers. What about law firms?

Have you read Seth Godin’s book: Purple Cow? I recommend it. Has your firm created a Purple Cow? In the book Seth Godin writes:

So how do you create an idea that spreads? Don’t try to make a product for everybody, because that is a product for nobody. The everybody products are all taken. The sneezers in these huge markets have too many choices and are too satisfied for it to be likely that you will capture their interest.

The way you break through to the mainstream is to target a niche instead of a huge market. With a niche, you can segment off a chunk of the mainstream, and create an ideavirus so focused that it overwhelms that small slice of the market that really and truly will respond to what you sell.

Does the old marketing model still work in 2013? What is the old marketing model? I believe the old marketing model was:

  • We are a full service law firm.
  • We represent a wide variety of industries.
  • We have these practice areas…

In the old model, lawyers sought clients. Why does this model no longer work? The demand for legal services is soft and there are many firms and lawyers from which to choose.

What is the new marketing model?

  • We are a law firm focused on industries.
  • Our lawyers understand your legal issues and as important understand your business.
  • We focus on these industries…

If you want some other opinions on this subject read: Next Generation of Law Firm Websites — Influenced by Social Media. There, Greenfield/Belser principal and creative director, Joe Walsh says:

Organize your website around client industry and client needs, not your law firm organization chart.

Just suppose, your law firm was known by industry leaders as having lawyers who have the greatest knowledge of the industries. Just suppose your law firm website was organized around client industry and client needs, wouldn’t that be a “purple cow?”