Does this question puzzle you? I always tried to “create a market” by identifying a problem and creating the solution before clients even realized a problem existed.

I learned the value of meeting unvoiced needs when I first joined Jenkens & Gilchrist.  I had brought rolling bookcases of files and books with me.  I spent the first two days of my tenure in orientation meetings. When I finally had a chance to return to my office, a young man from our facilities group, Mason, was there.

MasBoy with books.jpgon looked at me and said:

Mr. Parvin, I know you need to be able to hit the ground running on Monday.  I want you to know I would be happy to come in tomorrow (Saturday) and help you unload and organize your books and files.

I had not thought about the task of getting everything organized so I could work productively.  He identified a problem and offered a solution before I discovered the problem.

Later the same year I had a big weekend planned to take eight couples from my largest and most important client to the Cowboys game on Sunday.  The Monday before, Jan from marketing called me. She said:

Cordell, finding our parking area and then finding our suite at Texas Stadium is a challenge if you have not done it before (it was a challenge each time I went to a game).  Why don’t I take you out there today and I will show you the exit off the highway, how to get to our reserved parking and then how to get to our suite?  That way on Sunday, everything will go smoothly with your clients.

To be candid, I had not thought about finding where we park or finding our suite. Jan identified a problem and offered a solution before I discovered the problem. That is providing value.

Are you anticipating your clients’ and potential clients’ needs and offering a solution before they see the problem? If not, read the business news and your clients’ industry news and think about the legal implications of the news you are reading.

I have always tried to “create a market” by identifying a problem and creating the solution before clients even realize a problem existed.
I learned the value of meeting unvoiced needs when I first joined Jenkens.  I had brought rolling bookcases of files and books with me.  I spent the first two days of my tenure in orientation meetings.  When I finally had a chance to return to my office, a young man from our facilities group, Mason, was there.  He looked at me and said “Mr. Parvin, I know you need to be able to hit the ground running on Monday.  I want you to know I would be happy to come in tomorrow (Saturday) and help you unload and organize your books and files.”  I had not thought about the task of getting everything organized so I could work productively.  He identified a problem and offered a solution before I discovered the problem.
Later the same year I had a big weekend planned to take eight couples from my largest and most important client to the Cowboys game on Sunday.  The Monday before, Jan from marketing called me.  She said:  “Cordell, finding our parking area and then finding our suite at Texas Stadium is a challenge if you have not done it before (it was a challenge each time I went to a game).  Why don’t I take you out there today and I will show you the exit off the highway, how to get to our reserved parking and then how to get to our suite?  That way on Sunday, everything will go smoothly with your clients.”  To be candid, I had not thought of the problem of finding where we park or finding our suite.  Jan identified a problem and offered a solution before I discovered the problem.  That is providing value.