In 2013, the lawyers who are creative will be of the greatest value to clients. Those lawyers will see what others miss. Yet, most of us lost our creativity and sense of adventure long ago.

A couple of years ago I wrote about getting it back in: How You Can Become a More Innovative and Creative Lawyer. More recently, I shared Brittaney Schmidt’s story in my blog: Can I encourage you to just “jump in”? Let’s go back to how you and I lost it.

As you know from a previous blog, I have recently enjoyed looking at old family photos. When looking at our photos of our daughter Jill, I remembered how creative she was when she was young.

For example, she played school with my grandmother who was essentially blind at the time. Jill was the teacher and Mommer, as we all called her, was the student who never measured up.

Take a look at these two photos of Jill. You can see she is in a very creative mood in both photos. I guarantee your parents have similar photos of you and if you have children, you likely have similar photos of them.

When you were young, you were incredibly creative. You were open and not afraid. Why and how did you lose it and how can you get it back? I found this St. Louis Dispatch article: Why children lose their creativity.

Harry Chapin wrote and sang a song titled: Flowers are Red. Here is a video and here are the lyrics:

(Spoken)Your son marches to the beat of a different drummer, comma.
(Spoken)But don’t worry,
(Spoken)We’ll have him joining the parade by the end of the term

The little boy went first day of school
He got some crayons and started to draw
He put colors all over the paper
For colors was what he saw
And the teacher said.. What you doin’ young man
I’m paintin’ flowers he said
She said… It’s not the time for art young man
And anyway flowers are green and red
There’s a time for everything young man
And a way it should be done
You’ve got to show concern for everyone else
For you’re not the only one

And she said…
Flowers are red young man
Green leaves are green
There’s no need to see flowers any other way
Than they way they always have been seen

But the little boy said…
There are so many colors in the rainbow
So many colors in the morning sun
So many colors in the flower and I see every one

Well the teacher said.. You’re sassy
There’s ways that things should be
And you’ll paint flowers the way they are
So repeat after me…..

And she said…
Flowers are red young man
Green leaves are green
There’s no need to see flowers any other way
Than they way they always have been seen

Green leaves are green
There’s no need to see flowers any other way
Than the way they always have been seen

But the little boy said…
There are so many colors in the rainbow
So many colors in the morning sun
So many colors in the flower and I see every one

The teacher put him in a corner
She said.. It’s for your own good..
And you won’t come out ’til you get it right
And all responding like you should
Well finally he got lonely
Frightened thoughts filled his head
And he went up to the teacher
And this is what he said.. and he said

Flowers are red, green leaves are green
There’s no need to see flowers any other way
Than the way they always have been seen

Time went by like it always does
And they moved to another town
And the little boy went to another school
And this is what he found
The teacher there was smilin’
She said…Painting should be fun
And there are so many colors in a flower
So let’s use every one

But that little boy painted flowers
In neat rows of green and red
And when the teacher asked him why
This is what he said.. and he said

Flowers are red, green leaves are green
There’s no need to see flowers any other way
Than the way they always have been seen.

But there still must be a way to have our children say . . .

There are so many colors in the rainbow
So many colors in the morning sun
So many colors in the flower and I see every one

I will leave you with this Seth Godin quote:

The joy of art is particularly sweet … because it carries with it the threat of rejection, of failure, and of missed connections. It’s precisely the high-wire act of “this might not work” that makes original art worth doing.