If you are a lawyer I have coached, you could have written this blog post. You likely remember, we talked about repurposing the content you create.

As we talk about repurposing what you create, keep these four points in mind:

  1. More often than not, clients hire lawyers rather than law firms.
  2. Client development is about relationship building.
  3. You will be considered by a new client based on recommendations or based on something you have written or presented.
  4. The recommendations more often than not will come from weak ties.

Have you handled a complex matter recently? If so, how can you reuse materials you created to educate other potential clients, referral sources and weak ties?

Take something that was created in your billable work that your client would give you the ok to share.

Create an article or blog post. From the article or blog post create a presentation or a webinar. From the handout for the presentation, create a guide.  You get the idea.

I always did that. Let me share an example.

In the early 90s, the Federal Highway Administration received permission from Congress to “experiment” with Design-Build construction of complex bridges and highways.

I knew the experiment would lead to states wanting to construct more and more projects by design-build contracts. I also knew contractors were unprepared for this change.

I decided to do workshops across the country to educate contractors. About 100 contractors attended. I had taken many hours to prepare the detailed handout materials. I wanted to get the materials in the hands 100s of other contractors .

When it became possible, I had our marketing department put the materials on my website where they could be easily downloaded. Here is a link to my Design-Build Guide.

Design-Build

Next, I broke out sections of the guide and created several articles that were published. The net effect was I reached a much wider audience by repackaging the materials I had worked so hard to create. In some cases I put materials in front of potential clients I had never met.

First, I was hired by a state in New England to help draft their first design-build contact.

A couple of years after that, I was hired by the contractor to help put together a proposal to install a very complex electronic toll collection system in the Northeast.

Because of my design-build articles and presentations, I was hired by several contractors to handle disputes arising from design-build contracts. All of these opportunities and engagements came as a result of creating content and reusing it.

Think about how you can repurpose materials you create.