Take a moment from your work and determine if you think you are on the right track. Want some help? Think of five questions to ask yourself.

A few years ago I read a short Entrepreneur Magazine article by Richard Branson: Five Secrets to Business Success and it made me think of five questions to ask to determine if you are on the road to a successful career.

What five questions would you ask? Here are questions I would ask:

  1. Have I identified the priorities in my life?
  2. Have I found the kind of legal work or kind of clients that I am passionate about?
  3. Am I raising my visibility and credibility to those clients?
  4. Am I building high trust relationships with clients and referral sources?
  5. Am I am exceeding my clients’ expectations?

What would you add to this list?

 

What is the client development skill you should be working on?

STORYTELLING

I will be sharing thoughts on storytelling this weekend with the women lawyers who will gather in Fort Worth for our Third Annual Outstanding Women Lawyers Roundtable.

If you are surprised I would pick that skill to work on, take a look at this Entrepreneur Magazine article: Why You Need to Become a Better Storyteller or this HBR Article which includes an interview with screenwriter Robert McKee: Storytelling That Moves People.  (I wrote about Robert McKee and his well known book in: What is one “key” ingredient to your success you are overlooking?  Here are just a few important lines from the HBR article:

Persuasion is the centerpiece of business activity.

I think we would all agree with that premise.

Most lawyers cannot or will not give a presentation without PowerPoint slides.  The authors believe that is not a very effective way to persuade people. They say:

The other way to persuade people—and ultimately a much more powerful way—is by uniting an idea with an emotion. The best way to do that is by telling a compelling story.

So what is a story? The authors answer:

Essentially, a story expresses how and why life changes.

How do storytellers discover and unearth the stories that want to be told? This is one I will let you read for yourself and figure out how you can best use the points for your own client development. At the risk of being “touchy-feely,” go back to when you were young and told and listened to stories.

If you want more help or ideas, take a look at this Copyblogger post: The 5 Things Every (Great) Marketing Story Needs. Start with Number 1.  The mistake many lawyers and law firms make is to make themselves the hero in the story. It is far more effective when your potential client is the hero.

 

Take a moment from your work and determine if you think you are on the right track. Want some help? Think of five questions to ask yourself.

I recently read a short Entrepreneur Magazine article by Richard Branson: Five Secrets to Business Success and it made me think of five questions to ask to determine if you are on the road to a successful career. What five questions would you ask? Here are questions I would ask:

  1. Have I identified the priorities in my life?
  2. Have I found the kind of legal work or kind of clients that I am passionate about?
  3. Am I raising my visibility and credibility to those clients?
  4. Am I building high trust relationships with clients and referral sources?
  5. Am I am exceeding my clients’ expectations?

What would you add to this list?

 

This is the last in my series of blog posts on ideas you might use from Entrepreneur Magazine’s Social Media Challenge.  I enjoyed reading How to Master the Social-Media Best and suggest you take a look at it for ideas of things you can do during the day.

If you are using social media to become more visible and credible to a target market, you will learn from this post that it is important to have a plan for your day. Don’t just do things randomly. I find many lawyers who post many things on LinkedIn or Twitter, but there is no focus to it. In some cases I wonder when the lawyer is practicing law since he or she has so many posts.

As you will also see when you read the post, the writer/consultants take time to find something valuable to talk about. Then they suggest using HootSuite to time posts on social media during the day and reach different readers.

On December 22, 2010, Entrepreneur posted Our Social Media Push Passes the Sales Test which included the results achieved from the Social Media campaign created by LeeReedy/Xylem Digital. Take a look, the results are pretty impressive.

This is the second post on social media in my series based on the Social Media Challenge Entrepreneur Magazine created. The magazine’s second post was: The Launch: On the Scene with Big Papa’s BBQ.

What can you or your law firm do based on the lesson in this post? I suggest you do a free program at your office. It might be a “Breakfast Briefing” or a “Lunch and Learn.” Pick a topic that your target market would really care about. Then, in addition to inviting clients, figure out which potential clients and referral sources are on Twitter and use Twitter to invite them. You might also announce the program on your LinkedIn page and/or your Facebook business page.

When you do the Breakfast Briefing or Lunch and Learn, make sure those who attend know how to find you and your firm on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. Include links in your handout materials.

Over Thanksgiving I came across an Entrepreneur Magazine Social Media Challenge Series. As you will see when you read the introduction, Entrepreneur Magazine says:

We asked the creative thinkers Denver digital marketing firm LeeReedy/Xylem Digital to help us take a local business, Big Papa’s Barbeque, from zero social presence to big-time social network strategist.

I bet you know my immediate thought:

Which suggestions in the test can you utilize and how can you utilize them?

The first post was Shh! You Have to Listen to Learn. The authors say:

The first step in any good social-media campaign is to listen. Find the conversations and become a fly on the wall.

I believe the first step in any client development campaign is to listen. You should determine what is being said about you and your law firm. One way is to set up Google alerts for your name and your law firm name. You also want to set up alerts on your legal specialty. The writers suggest you set up the same terms using Hootsuite. So, if I was still practicing transportation construction law, I might have alerts on each of my clients, my clients competitors, my clients’ industry associations and:

  • Bridge construction
  • Highway construction
  • Road construction
  • Airport construction
  • Rail construction

I realize that those broad terms will give me more information than I really want. So, I will have to determine if I can scroll through the information I am not interested efficiently or if I need to narrow my alerts.

Why should you listen? For me, the answer has always been simple: I want to learn of breaking business issues and figure out how they may generate a legal issue for my clients.

The second post by Entrepreneur Magazine was The Launch: On the Scene with Big Papa’s BBQ. In Part 2 of this series I will share my thoughts from that post. In the meantime, I urge you to subscribe to Entrepreneur Magazine, subscribe to its blog and follow it on Twitter.